Should you be giving your child a probiotic?

Taking a probiotic can help deal with nausea and other digestive issues like diarrhea and vomiting. But should you be giving one to your child on a regular basis? And are the probiotics they get from foods like yoghurt enough, or should you use a supplement?

What are probiotics?

Probiotics, also known as ‘good bacteria’ or ‘flora’, live naturally in your gastrointestinal system. When your health is good, it means that the good bacteria have outnumbered the bad. This lets your body run as normal. In fact, there are more bacteria in your body than there are cells. Probiotics which are the ‘good bacteria’ promote a healthy immune system, support weight management, and prevent occasional diarrhea or constipation. But an imbalance of good versus bad bacteria can lead to issues such as:

  • Weight gain
  • Skin conditions
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Various chronic health conditions

Read here for three foods to encourage growth in your toddler

Probiotics occur naturally in the body and can also be ingested through certain foods or supplements. For children attending creche or daycare, and are therefore more susceptible to bugs and infections, probiotics could be a way of stemming trips to the doctor. Probiotics are passed from mother to baby through breastmilk, boosting the baby’s immune system.

Less illness

Research has shown that regular intake of probiotics in babies aged two to 12 months resulted in fewer rates of ear infections and less respiratory diseases.

Similar:  All you need to know about the three stages of ovulation

Probiotics can be advised after a bout of antibiotics, in order to build up the good bacteria or ‘flora’ in the gut.

Probiotics in foods

Already in foods like yoghurt, buttermilk and ice cream, you may find that you’re already in taking probiotics without really knowing it. If you’d like to give it to your kids in their food as opposed to a supplement, looks for foods that say ‘Live and Active Cultures’ on the packaging.

maternity&infant
Share

Related Articles

Register Your Interest. Sign up to our mailing list!

By pressing subscribe you agree to our terms & conditions.

Thanks for Subscribing!

Your subscription has been confirmed. You've been added to our list and will hear from us soon!

Share
Share