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Study shows men more likely to relax on days off than women

If this study were the product of literally any wife and/or mother, we would not be surprised.

I mean, did we really need a study to tell us what we’ve known forever? I would say it’s insulting, but then again, the guys have such literal and analytical minds that maybe showing them the numbers might make a difference. Might.

Anyways, here’s what the study said – just to give yourselves some cold hard proof.

The study

The research consisted of 52 couples who participated in the New Parents Project with Ohio State University.

The study found that three months after the birth of their first child when couples were not working, men were found to be relaxing for more time while women did housework or childcare than women did while men did similar tasks.

The study comes as a huge disappointment to us who had hoped for a more equal distribution of so-called ‘gendered tasks’ in the home at this day in age.

Dad not doing enough? Read here for some ideas!

The results

Some of the statistics include:

  • Women spent 46 to 49 minutes relaxing while men did childcare or housework on their day off. But men spent about twice that amount of time in leisure – about 101 minutes – while their partners did some kind of work.
  • On workdays, after the baby was born, the amount of time women and men spent doing housework and childcare was more equal than on non-workdays.
  • But men made up for it on non-workdays, when the amount of time they spent in leisure activities actually doubled – from 47 to 101 minutes – between when their partner was pregnant and three months after the birth.
  • On their days off, men were relaxing 46 percent of the time while their partners did child care. In contrast, women were engaged in relaxing activities only 16 percent of the time when their partners were taking care of their child.
  • Results were similar for housework, where fathers took 35 percent of the time off while their partner did tasks like cleaning. Women took 19 percent of the time off when men did housework.
Similar:  Study finds that parents DO have favourites

Although it was a small sample of couples used in the study we don’t think it’s terribly surprising to hear.

Don’t agree with us? Let us know! How does your partner help around the house and with the kids?

This study was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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