5 signs of early pregnancy

These are some signs to watch out for if you think you’re in early pregnancy. Unfortunately, it takes a while for the early effects of pregnancy to subside. But once the second-trimester kicks-in, you will begin to feel a whole lot more like yourself again with an added energy and a beautiful pregnancy glow.

Missed period

A missed period is the most reliable sign of pregnancy, especially if your period is usually regular. If you’ve missed a period the best thing to do is get to the chemist and find out!

Sore breasts

This is one of the most telling early signs that you could be pregnant. Nearly straight-away breasts become tender and sore. There is little that can be done to ease the discomfort apart from wearing a very supportive bra. Breasts may also appear bigger.

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Fatigue

Tiredness can plague you throughout the first trimester and again, kicks in pretty much straight away. Get lots of rest when you have the time. If you feel a sudden constant exhaustion it could indicate you are pregnant.

Nausea

Morning sickness usually occurs around the six weeks mark, with some experiencing it even earlier. This queasiness usually subsides in the second trimester but be aware morning sickness is is a misnomer as it is capable of striking morning, noon and night.

Increased urination

This is continuous throughout the entire pregnancy.  By the time week 40 comes you could be making trips to the toilet every 15 minutes. You may not mind so much at the beginning but by the end you may be cursing the urge to pee all the way to the toilet.

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Other signs of pregnancy could be headaches due to increases in hormones, bloating and constipation, back ache, food cravings, stronger sense of smell, bouts of dizziness or fainting and mood swings. Although we usually incur mood swings once monthly, if you’re pregnant you have an excuse to be as moody and argumentative as you like!

maternity & infant